I think Martin Luther said it well in his famous hymn “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God”: “For still our ancient foe doth seek to work us woe – his craft and power are great, and, armed with cruel hate, on earth is not his equal.”

There is one weapon in particular that may be his most potent of all. Sometimes we don’t even know he is using it on us when, in fact, he is doing so with great effect. I’m talking about the tactic of compromise.

I think more people have been brought down by compromise than by all other sins put together.

We see this illustrated in a familiar story from the Old Testament, the story of Moses taking the children of Israel out of bondage in Egypt. God had made it very clear to Moses that he was to go and free the Israelites, who were being held there as slaves. God also told Moses that Pharaoh would not be very agreeable toward this proposition and would resist him.

God brought a series of 10 successive plagues against Pharaoh and the Egyptians. Each one grew in intensity. But instead of responding to these plagues and repenting, Pharaoh’s heart grew harder and harder.

The Egyptians worshiped many gods. They believed the animals were gods. They believed the Nile River, which was their source of life, was also a god. They believed that practically everything and everyone was a god.

God brought a series of 10 successive plagues against Pharaoh and the Egyptians. Each one grew in intensity. But instead of responding to these plagues and repenting, Pharaoh’s heart grew harder and harder.

The Egyptians worshiped many gods. They believed the animals were gods. They believed the Nile River, which was their source of life, was also a god. They believed that practically everything and everyone was a god.

It’s ironic that the various plagues God brought against the Egyptians essentially were their gods, if you will, turning against them. They had a plague of lice. They had a plague of frogs. They had the Nile River turn to blood. Still, they would not respond to what God was trying to say. Pharaoh’s heart simply grew harder and harder and harder.

It’s a reminder to us of how hard our hearts can become as well. God is trying to do a work in us, but we resist that work so our hearts grow more calloused.

It’s sort of like the beginning of summer when you decide to go to the beach. You pull off your socks and shoes and step onto blazing hot sand. You run toward your spot, but you have to stop and camp out on someone’s towel for a minute. Then you go to another towel and another one. Finally you lay out your own towel.

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