Persecution in America

Slavery, abortion: More closely linked than the party of Donkeys will admit

February 13, 2019

Lincoln warned, Jan. 27, 1837: “At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us; it cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen we must live through all time, or die by suicide.”

Lincoln stated at Edwardsville, Illinois, Sept. 11, 1858: “What constitutes the bulwark of our own liberty and independence? It is not our frowning battlements, our bristling sea coasts, our army and our navy. These are not our reliance against tyranny. All of those may be turned against us. … Our reliance is in the love of liberty which God has planted in us. Our defense is in the spirit which prized liberty as the heritage of all men, in all lands everywhere. Destroy this spirit and you have planted the seeds of despotism at your own doors … you have lost the genius of your own independence and become the fit subjects of the first cunning tyrant who rises among you.”

Lincoln wrote to William Dodge, Feb. 23, 1861: “Freedom is the natural condition of the human race, in which the Almighty intended men to live. Those who fight the purpose of the Almighty will not succeed.”

Reflecting on the slavery in the Southern Democrat states, Lincoln wrote to H.L. Pierce on April 6, 1859: “This is a world of compensation. … Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves, and under a just God, cannot long retain it.”

This could also be said of those supporting abortion today, as Ronald Reagan wrote in “Abortion and the Conscience of the Nation” (The Human Life Review, 1983): “Lincoln recognized that we could not survive as a free land when some men could decide that others were not fit to be free and should be slaves. … Likewise, we cannot survive as a free nation when some men decide that others are not fit to live and should be abandoned to abortion.”

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