The Lord’s Prayer will change from “and lead us not into temptation” to “do not let us fall into temptation.”

The official change was announced on May 22nd during the General Assembly of the Episcopal Conference of Italy.

R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, told the Times.

“I was shocked and appalled, this is the Lord’s Prayer. It is not, and has never been, the pope’s prayer, and we have the very words of Jesus in the New Testament. It is those very words that the pope proposes to change. It is not only deeply problematic, it’s almost breathtaking.”

The phrase “lead us not into temptation” appears in both the Matthew 6:9-15 version and the version in Luke 11:2-4. Since the same verbiage is used by two different gospel writers, it is clear what Jesus meant to say. Changing Lord’s prayer should not be up to further interpretation.

Of course, the traditional translation of the verse can prompt questions about what it means for God to not lead us into temptation. It does not mean that God tempts us, because God does not tempt with evil, but it does mean that we should ask Him to lead us away from temptations, lest we sin. This prayer involves acknowledging our own weakness to temptation and asking God to guide us away from it.

It’s fairly clear throughout the Bible that God tests those whom He plans use to do His work as part of the refining process.

“I will bring the one-third through the fire, Will refine them as silver is refined, And test them as gold is tested. They will call on My name, And I will answer them. I will say, ‘This is My people’; And each one will say, ‘The Lord is my God.’ ” Zechariah 13:9

If the pope wants to fix things, he should consider working on actual errors in the Catholic text. It is “repent” of our sins, not “do penance” for our sins. He needs to look at texts that show that Jesus indeed had [half] brothers and sisters [there are several that are quite conclusive and obvious], that Joseph did not “know” Mary UNTIL Jesus was born, etc. etc.